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Juicing Lemons Like A Pro: 5 Expert Tricks For Juicing Citrus Fruit At Home

Juicing Lemons & Citrus Fruit

Do you have what it takes for properly juicing lemons and other citrus fruit? Turns out you just need some little-known juicing tips. Here are a few to get you started.

 

Fresh citrus juice is the best for cooking, baking, and mixing drinks of all kinds.

Plus, they have all sorts of amazing health benefits. Citrus juices are packed with vitamin C, a natural immune system booster

They also have anti-oxidants, which are helpful in preventing and combating cancer, heart disease, and degenerative diseases.

However, juicing citrus fruit isn't the easiest thing in the world to do. In fact, it can be positively frustrating.

When dealing with citrus fruit, such as lemons, juicing can be incredibly messy. Additionally, it's difficult to get all the juice out of them and not all over your hands.

Need help? Don't worry, we've got some answers!

Here are 5 brilliant tips for juicing lemons!

Freeze 'Em

Juicing lemons is much easier if you freeze them first. Now, you need to let them thaw before you actually juice them, but you'll be glad you did it!

Freezing lemons causes the juices within to expand. This breaks down the cell walls of the lemon. When it thaws, it will be softer and easier to squeeze!

Cut Length, Not Width

To get the most juice out of your lemon, try cutting the fruit down the length, rather than the width.

This will leave more surface area of the inside of the lemon. Cutting it down the length also makes the lemon easier to grip and squeeze. 

When juicing lemons by hand, this is the best bet to get the most juice.

Roll it Out

Similar to freezing lemons, rolling lemons out on the countertop will also break down the cell walls, make them softer and easier to squeeze.

Treat the lemon like a ball of clay you're trying to soften up. Don't be too gentle. However, if you press so hard the lemon bursts open, you're being a little too rough.

Pick the Right Fruit

A big aspect of success juicing lemons is picking the right lemon!

Go for the big, plump, and firm lemons. They will be the easiest to squeeze and the most rewarding. They should be bright yellow with no hints of green.

Any green color on the lemon suggests it is unripe, while a paler color of yellow suggests an older lemon which will have less juice.

If you're really on your game, you can plant your own lemon tree and pick lemons right off of the branches!

Use a Squeezer for Juicing Lemons

Of course, one of the most hassle-free ways for juicing lemons is with an actual juicer. Well, it's more of a lemon squeezer.

This squeezer is handheld and pushes nearly all of the juice out of lemon halves. If you're looking for getting as much juice as possible out of your lemons, this is the way to go.

Citrus Simplified

We love helping our customers get the freshest citrus fruit and trees on the market! There's nothing worse than coming home from the grocery store with bad fruit. You don't want to waste it but you definitely don't want to eat it!

Trust us to get you the best citrus fruit and trees out there for growing and juicing your very own lemons, limes, oranges, and more! We provide fast-growing citrus fruit trees you can grow indoors or plant in your own back yard!

For more about US Citrus, click here!

 

 

4 Common Types of Lemons You'll Find in Your Local Grocery Store

Common Types of Lemons

Knowing the different types of lemons can help you determine the ideal options for you. Read on to learn the common options you can find at your local store.

A lemon isn't just a lemon.

Instead, there are dozens of different types of lemons.

The different types of lemons can be a bit of a mystery to those who aren't in the know.

If you're looking for some of the most common varieties of lemon that are hanging around the grocery store you're in the right place.

Read on and we'll describe four of the most commonly sold lemon types you can find at the store or as lemon trees, and tell you what they're best for.

1. Lisbon Lemons

Most often labeled as just plain lemons in grocery stores, Lisbon lemons are one of the varieties which commonly come to mind when you picture a lemon.

They're an acidic variety of the fruit, as opposed to a sweet one, and are commonly found in supermarkets worldwide.

They're one of the smoother varieties of lemon and can be distinguished from Eureka lemons by the presence of a pointed end opposite the stem.

2. Eureka Lemons

Extremely similar to Lisbon lemons in taste and texture, Eureka lemons can be distinguished by having a neck beneath the stem and a rougher texture.

When it comes to culinary uses the two varieties of lemon are pretty much indistinguishable. They have extremely similar profiles in taste and acidity, close enough that few people can tell the difference at all.

If you have the option, however, the thicker skin of Eureka lemons make them a slightly better choice for zest.

Want to grow your own? We offer fast-growing Eureka lemon trees for sale.

3. Meyer Lemons

Meyer lemons are actually a hybrid fruit and not a true lemon. The plant originates from crossbreeding citron and mandarin.

They're one of the few varieties that you'll find labeled separately in a grocery store.

Due to their hybrid origins, Meyer lemons are much further on the sweet side of things than most other varieties of lemon.'

They can be distinguished from common lemons by their smaller size and darker coloration. They tend to hit the shelves in winter and early spring as well since they're one of the best varieties to grow indoors.

They're a fascinating variety, but don't try to substitute them for regular lemons in cooking unless you're sure the different flavor profile will suit the dish better.

Want to try this interesting hybrid lemon? Try out some fast-growing Meyer lemon trees for sale as well!

4. Bearss Lemons

Similar in appearance to both the Eureka and Lisbon lemons are Bearss lemons. The cultivar originated in Italy but can now be found growing in Florida.

Bearss lemons sometimes hit the shelves, often as another generic variety of "lemon."

While one of the cultivars which appear in stores, the Bearss lemon differentiates itself primarily by its various commercial uses.

The trees carry a larger-than-normal amount of fruit and the peels contain a higher portion of essential oils than Lisbon or Eureka which makes them an attractive choice for those who are looking to capitalize on various refined lemon products.

The Many Types of Lemons

This is just a small sample of the many exotic lemons which can be found if you know where to look. For the most part, these four types of lemons form the bulk of the lemon trade in the US.

With a growing interest in exotic cultivars, however, we may be seeing other varieties on shelves in the near future.

Or, you can grow your own citrus trees!

If you're ready to start caring for your own citrus trees then check out our citrus blog where we regularly provide insight and tips to help your citrus gardening endeavors.

Lemon Picking: How to Tell When a Lemon is Ripe and Ready to Eat

How to Tell When a Lemon is Ripe and Ready to Eat

Are your lemons ripe enough to pick and ready to eat, or do they need a little more time? Read on to learn how to spot a ripe lemon and when to harvest your lemons.

Some fruits have all the luck. 

They give clear hints when they’re mature enough to be eaten.

Avocados turn a dark shade of green. Bananas make the final transition from green to yellow. Even tomatoes turn a deeper color to let you know they’re ready. 

But lemons? Their cues are a little more challenging to interpret.

Here are a few tips to help you determine whether a lemon is ripe enough to pick. 

Harvest Season

There are three common varieties of lemon: Lisbon, Eureka, and Meyer. Your local grocery store, however, is only likely to mark them as "lemons". Of the three, Meyer is considered the sweetest, and it's what we sell here at US Citrus.

The harvest time for lemons varies, with warm or coastal climates such as California, Florida and Texas producing year-round. Inland varietals are generally ready for harvest in the fall and winter.

With proper care, a citrus tree will start bearing fruit in its second year. It should deliver a substantial harvest in its third year and beyond. Mature potted trees will produce up to 50 pounds a year, and one in the ground will generate 50-120 pounds of fruit a year.

From the time a small green lemon appears on a tree, it will generally take several months to ripen.

How to Tell if a Lemon is Ripe

When lemons appear yellow or yellowish green, are firm in appearance, and have reached two to three inches in size, they're ready to pluck. Lemons prefer to ripen on the tree, so if you pick them too soon you may be out of luck.

Ripe lemons have a glossy skin and are not ripe until the color truly develops. If the skin is wrinkled, dull or squishy, you're too late. It's better to pick a lemon too early than to wait too long.

Because lemons may go through a green-colored phase, some people have a hard time discerning lemons vs limes. We'll save that distinction for another time!

Test It, Taste It

Even if the appearance checks off all the right boxes, you should cut one lemon open to determine if the rest of the tree is ripe. A ripe lemon will have lots of juice and firm flesh. 

Lemons are tart by nature, so leaving them on the tree will not improve their sweetness. The exception is Meyer lemons, which are milder and sweeter, to begin with. 

Do a taste and decide whether it's ready.  

How to Pick It

This isn't rocket science. The main goal is not to damage the lemon tree. You can use a hand-held snipper or simply take the lemon in your hand and twist it until it breaks free. 

Grow Your Own

If you're not lucky enough to have neighbors who let you pick their ripe lemons, you might want to consider getting your own potted citrus tree.

With a few simple steps, you can grow one anywhere and enjoy lemons year-round! You can read more about container gardening here

Check out our other citrus blog posts for more citrus tree and fruit tips, insight, recipes, and other helpful information.

Lemon Water for Weight Loss: How and Why it Works

Lemon Water for Weight Loss

Have you heard about the benefits of lemon water for weight loss? Learn how and why this works below.

Would you like lemon with your water?

Yes! The answer is always yes!

Lemons are packed full of great stuff including vitamin C, pectin, and citric acid. And getting your daily fill of these nutrients keeps you in tip-top shape. The best part is, you can even grow lemons in your own home so you've always got them on hand.

But do lemons help you lose weight? Studies point to "yes". Incorporating lemons and lemon water into your diet helps you feel fuller and stay on track.

In this article, we'll discuss why lemon water for weight loss is a great idea. And how you can incorporate this magical fruit into your diet.

The Buzz About Lemons

Lemons reside in the "fruit and vegetable" segment of the food pyramid. Meaning, they are an essential part of a healthy, balanced diet. Let's take a look at why lemons and lemon water can help you reach your weight loss goals.

It Takes the "Boring" Out of Water

Water is a critical part of weight management. Over half of your body is made of water. That means you need to keep yourself hydrated if you want to stay healthy.

Often, when we feel hungry, it's actually because we need hydration. Lemons make your water less "so-so" and more "yes-yes"!

Also, when you add lemons to your water you get vitamins and nutrients as part of the deal. The nutrients in lemons help clear out toxins and get your metabolism moving.

The Vitamin C Effect

One lemon contains all of your daily vitamin C needs. And even though you probably won't eat an entire lemon, using the juice helps you get to those vitamin goals.

Here are a few of the benefits of getting the right amount of vitamin C on a regular basis:

  • Better eye health
  • Firmer, smoother skin
  • Stronger immune function
  • Better cardiovascular health

Some Other Great Ways to Use Lemons

Lemon water is one of the most common ways to use lemons in your diet. And it's super easy to make! Start with water, add lemon juice. That's it!

You can squeeze the lemon into your water or add whole slices of lemon. This keeps the rind and pulp intact. And these elements of the lemon have great vitamins and nutrients as well.

If you're a tea drinker, add lemon to your tea for an extra kick. Or use lemons when you cook. They are an incredible way to spice up roasted veggies. 

Another great tip is to make lemon ice. Create a concentrated mixture of lemon juice, water, and lemon zest. Then pour it into ice cube trays and freeze.

If you have these lemon ice cubes on hand all the time, you'll always be able to create lemon water on a hot day.

Lemon Water for Weight Loss: The Key to Success!

Using lemon water for weight loss is just one of the many natural weight loss tools available to help you reach your goals. Because lemons are a fruit, they are packed with essential vitamins and minerals.

Drinking lemon water helps you get in your daily intake of vitamin C. This vitamin is so important to your body functions. 

And putting lemon in your water gives it spark and pizzazz. You'll have no problem sticking to your water regimen if you've got lemon water on hand. 

Thinking about growing your own citrus trees and citrus fruit? Check out our FAQ page for more information on how you can bring fresh, fragrant citrus right into your home.